Overview

The Student Resilience Survey is a 47-item measure comprising 12 subscales measuring students’ perceptions of their individual characteristics as well as protective factors embedded in the environment:

Communication and cooperation, self-esteem, empathy, problem solving, goals and aspirations, family connection, school connection, community connection, autonomy experience, pro-social peers, meaningful participation in community activity and peer support

Each item was rated on a 5-point scale (1 = never to 5 = always).

Psychometric properties

The findings suggest that the SRS is a valid measure assessing these relevant protective factors, thereby serving as a valuable tool in resilience and mental health research.

Property Definition SRS
Reliability Degree to which respondents in a similar sample had similar scores

The internal consistency for all the subscales was good

All the SRS subscales had high reliability and the subscales (except for empathy) were negatively associated with mental health problems, global subjective distress and impact on health (Lereya et al.2016)

Internal consistency The degree to which similar items within a scale correlate with each other

The internal consistency for all the subscales was good (Lereya at al, 2016)

Test-retest reliability Degree to which the same respondents have the same score after period of time when trait shouldn’t have changed No information at present
Criterion validity Extent to which a measure is related to an outcome

Our results showed that SRS subscales have loaded uniquely onto their respective 10-factor structure. All the SRS subscales had high reliability and the subscales (except for empathy) were negatively associated with mental health problems, global subjective distress and impact on health. Given the interest of investigating the relationship between risk, psychological outcomes and development, the SRS provides an exciting possibility to assess several different protective factors, and can thus be used as a valuable measurement tool in resilience and risk factor research (Lereya at al, 2016).


Populations

The survey is appropriate for children aged 7 and older

Translation

None known.

Administration

The survey is appropriate for children aged 7 and older and comes in a single child reported version

Terms of use

Free to use. Please contact author for further information regarding the copyright.

References

Lereya, S.T. et al. (2016). The student resilience survey: psychometric validation and associations with mental health. Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, 10:44. 

Sun, J., & Stewart, D. (2007). Development of population-based resilience measures in the primary school setting. Health Education, 7(6), 575-599.